A Boy and His Atom: The World's Smallest Movie

Under embargo until 12:01 a.m. ET May 1, 2013

Everything about the movies is typically big: the sets, celebrities, explosions and much more. Using the smallest object known for engineering data storage – atoms - IBM scientists shrunk the big screen down to the atomic level and created "The World’s Smallest Movie: A Boy and His Atom."
In a breakthrough requiring thousands of precisely placed atoms to act as actors, props, and scenes, the tiny Guinness World Record certified movie is comprised of almost 250 stop-motion frames that were combined into an animated film.
To help bring this world of atoms to life, the scientists used a unique two-ton microscope that operates at -268 degrees Celsius to tell a short story of a boy (who’s made of atoms) playing with an individual atom.
This team of scientists also used these same tools and techniques to beam Star Trek fans to another dimension to see franchise-inspired images they made out of atoms. These images will launch exclusively on the Star Trek Into Darkness mobile app.
Developing the first atom-sized stop motion film and Star Trek images isn’t entirely new ground for IBM. In the age of Big Data, as storage needs get bigger, the technology to store it has to get smaller — down to the atomic level. In commercial applications today, it takes 1 million atoms to store a single bit of data, but IBM recently announced atomic-scale memory technology that can store a bit of data with only 12 atoms and could one day store every movie ever made in a device the size of a fingernail.
Click here for the full press release.
Ari EntinIBM Communicationsaentin@us.ibm.com(408) 927-2272

Everything about the movies is typically big: the sets, celebrities, explosions and much more. Using the smallest object known for engineering data storage – atoms - IBM scientists shrunk the big screen down to the atomic level and created "The World’s Smallest Movie: A Boy and His Atom."

In a breakthrough requiring thousands of precisely placed atoms to act as actors, props, and scenes, the tiny Guinness World Record certified movie is comprised of almost 250 stop-motion frames that were combined into an animated film.

To help bring this world of atoms to life, the scientists used a unique two-ton microscope that operates at -268 degrees Celsius to tell a short story of a boy (who’s made of atoms) playing with an individual atom.

This team of scientists also used these same tools and techniques to beam Star Trek fans to another dimension to see franchise-inspired images they made out of atoms. These images will launch exclusively on the Star Trek Into Darkness mobile app.

Developing the first atom-sized stop motion film and Star Trek images isn’t entirely new ground for IBM. In the age of Big Data, as storage needs get bigger, the technology to store it has to get smaller — down to the atomic level. In commercial applications today, it takes 1 million atoms to store a single bit of data, but IBM recently announced atomic-scale memory technology that can store a bit of data with only 12 atoms and could one day store every movie ever made in a device the size of a fingernail.

Click here for the full press release.

Ari Entin
IBM Communications
aentin@us.ibm.com
(408) 927-2272

— 11 months ago with 1 note

IBM presents “The World’s Smallest Movie: A Boy and His Atom”

You’re about to see the movie that holds the Guinness World Records ™ record for the World’s Smallest Stop-Motion Film. The ability to move single atoms — the smallest particles of any element in the universe — is crucial to IBM’s research in the field of atomic memory. But even nanophysicists need to have a little fun. In that spirit, IBM researchers used a scanning tunneling microscope to move thousands of atoms, all in pursuit of making a movie so small it can only be seen when you magnify it 100 million times. A movie made with atoms. See how the world’s smallest movie was made at http://youtu.be/xA4QWwaweWA and learn more about atomic memory, data storage and big data.  

— 12 months ago with 6 notes

Moving Atoms: Making The World’s Smallest Movie

How did IBM researchers move all those atoms to make the world’s smallest movie? This short behind-the-scenes documentary takes you inside the lab. Meet the scientists, see how they made a movie with atoms, and find out more about their research in the field of atomic memory and data storage. See the world’s smallest movie at http://youtu.be/oSCX78-8-q0

— 12 months ago with 1 note
A Boy and His Atom movie stills can be viewed and downloaded in hi-res here: 
http://flickr.com/gp/ibm_research_zurich/6N0d3Q/

A Boy and His Atom movie stills can be viewed and downloaded in hi-res here

http://flickr.com/gp/ibm_research_zurich/6N0d3Q/

— 12 months ago
A Boy and His Atom behind-the-scenes photos can be viewed and downloaded in hi-res here: 
http://flickr.com/gp/ibm_research_zurich/6N0d3Q/

A Boy and His Atom behind-the-scenes photos can be viewed and downloaded in hi-res here

http://flickr.com/gp/ibm_research_zurich/6N0d3Q/

— 12 months ago
Atomic Shorts Video Playlist →

In this series of video shorts, you’ll see how IBM set the Guinness World Records ™ record for the World’s Smallest Stop-Motion Film. IBM is exploring new technology that will likely change the future of computing and data storage. 

— 12 months ago
IBM Reports from the Lab Video Playlist →

In these video diary segments, IBM scientists take you through daily progress in making the world’s smallest movie. IBM is exploring new technology that will likely change the future of computing and data storage. 

— 12 months ago
Atomic Star Trek images: Live Long and Prosper
Atomic Star Trek images can be viewed and downloaded in hi-res here: http://flickr.com/gp/ibm_research_zurich/6N0d3Q 
IBM Scientists Use Atoms to Create Star Trek Inspired ImagesExclusively on Star Trek ‘Into Darkness’ App
SAN JOSE, Calif. – May 1, 2013: Scientists from IBM (NYSE: IBM) beam Star Trek fans into another dimension to see franchise-inspired images made from one of the smallest elements in the universe: atoms. Starting today, the Star Trek Into Darkness mobile app for iOS and Android devices will exclusively feature images of the USS Enterprise, the Star Trek Logo and the ‘live long and prosper’ sign. IBM scientists made these images out of individual atoms and captured them with a powerful camera.
Created with the same scientific equipment and techniques used to make the world’s smallest movie, “A Boy and His Atom” — also released today — these images were made by precisely moving hundreds of atoms with a two-ton microscope, operating at a temperature of negative 268 Celsius and magnified 100 million times.
Developing the world’s smallest movie and Star Trek images out of atoms isn’t entirely new ground for IBM. Scientists at IBM have been moving atoms for decades to explore the limits of data storage because, as data creation and consumption gets bigger, data storage needs to get smaller, all the way down to the atomic level. To help share this atomic-scale world, IBM is giving Star Trek fans the opportunity to experience what IBM scientists see as the end of Moore’s Law – and a beginning on another frontier – single atoms.

Atomic Star Trek images: Live Long and Prosper

Atomic Star Trek images can be viewed and downloaded in hi-res here: http://flickr.com/gp/ibm_research_zurich/6N0d3Q 

IBM Scientists Use Atoms to Create Star Trek Inspired Images
Exclusively on Star Trek ‘Into Darkness’ App

SAN JOSE, Calif. – May 1, 2013: Scientists from IBM (NYSE: IBM) beam Star Trek fans into another dimension to see franchise-inspired images made from one of the smallest elements in the universe: atoms. Starting today, the Star Trek Into Darkness mobile app for iOS and Android devices will exclusively feature images of the USS Enterprise, the Star Trek Logo and the ‘live long and prosper’ sign. IBM scientists made these images out of individual atoms and captured them with a powerful camera.

Created with the same scientific equipment and techniques used to make the world’s smallest movie, “A Boy and His Atom” — also released today — these images were made by precisely moving hundreds of atoms with a two-ton microscope, operating at a temperature of negative 268 Celsius and magnified 100 million times.

Developing the world’s smallest movie and Star Trek images out of atoms isn’t entirely new ground for IBM. Scientists at IBM have been moving atoms for decades to explore the limits of data storage because, as data creation and consumption gets bigger, data storage needs to get smaller, all the way down to the atomic level. To help share this atomic-scale world, IBM is giving Star Trek fans the opportunity to experience what IBM scientists see as the end of Moore’s Law – and a beginning on another frontier – single atoms.

— 12 months ago with 3 notes